Jane eyre chapter 11. SparkNotes: Jane Eyre: Chapters 11

Chapter 11

jane eyre chapter 11

I really did not expect any Grace to answer; for the laugh was as tragic, as preternatural a laugh as any I ever heard; and, but that it was high noon, and that no circumstance of ghostliness accompanied the curious cachinnation; but that neither scene nor season favoured fear, I should have been superstitiously afraid. Jane helps the man rise to his feet and introduces herself to him. . All this is visible to you by the light of an oil lamp hanging from the ceiling, and by that of an excellent fire, near which I sit in my cloak and bonnet; my muff and umbrella lie on the table, and I am warming away the numbness and chill contracted by sixteen hours' exposure to the rawness of an October day: I left Lowton at four o'clock a. The charm of adventure sweetens that sensation, the glow of pride warms it; but then the throb of fear disturbs it; and fear with me became predominant when half-an-hour elapsed and still I was alone. The chapter begins with a direct address from the narrator, who tells readers that each new chapter in a novel is like a new scene in a play; when she draws the curtain, readers must imagine themselves in a new place. The steps and banisters were of oak; the staircase window was high and latticed; both it and the long gallery into which the bedroom doors opened looked as if they belonged to a church rather than a house.

Next

Jane Eyre Chapter 11 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

jane eyre chapter 11

Join our Sonnet-A-Day Newsletter and read them all, one at a time. Leah, make a little hot negus and cut a sandwich or two: here are the keys of the storeroom. He gives Adèle the present she has been anxiously awaiting, and while Adèle plays, Rochester is uncharacteristically chatty with Jane. Our progress was leisurely, and gave me ample time to reflect; I was content to be at length so near the end of my journey; and as I leaned back in the comfortable though not elegant conveyance, I meditated much at my ease. In addressing the reader directly, the narrator identifies her reader as companion and friend, someone who is expected to peer into Jane's life and vicariously share her experiences. To be sure it is pleasant at any time; for Thornfield is a fine old hall, rather neglected of late years perhaps, but still it is a respectable place; yet you know in winter-time one feels dreary quite alone in the best quarters. Varens is the name of your future pupil.

Next

Chapter 11

jane eyre chapter 11

Fairfax may not turn out a second Mrs. Fairfax tells her that the laugh belongs to Grace Poole, an eccentric servant. Adèle's mother was a dancer and singer, and Adèle is also an adept performer, who sings an opera song for Jane. It is a very strange sensation to inexperienced youth to feel itself quite alone in the world, cut adrift from every connection, uncertain whether the port to which it is bound can be reached, and prevented by many impediments from returning to that it has quitted. I suppose he had considered that these were all the governess would require for her private perusal; and, indeed, they contented me amply for the present; compared with the scanty pickings I had now and then been able to glean at Lowood, they seemed to offer an abundant harvest of entertainment and information. I dare say he is clever, but I never had much conversation with him.

Next

SparkNotes: Jane Eyre: Chapters 11

jane eyre chapter 11

I found my pupil sufficiently docile, though disinclined to apply: she had not been used to regular occupation of any kind. I bethought myself to ring the bell. I was yet enjoying the calm prospect and pleasant fresh air, yet listening with delight to the cawing of the rooks, yet surveying the wide, hoary front of the hall, and thinking what a great place it was for one lonely little dame like Mrs. She came and shook hand with me when she heard that I was her governess; and as I led her in to breakfast, I addressed some phrases to her in her own tongue: she replied briefly at first, but after we were seated at the table, and she had examined me some ten minutes with her large hazel eyes, she suddenly commenced chattering fluently. Yet it was merely a very pretty drawing-room, and within it a boudoir, both spread with white carpets, on which seemed laid brilliant garlands of flowers; both ceiled with snowy mouldings of white grapes and vine-leaves, beneath which glowed in rich contrast crimson couches and ottomans; while the ornaments on the pale Pariain mantelpiece were of sparkling Bohemian glass, ruby red; and between the windows large mirrors repeated the general blending of snow and fire. Rochester's visits here are rare, they are always sudden and unexpected; and as I observed that it put him out to find everything swathed up, and to have a bustle of arrangement on his arrival, I thought it best to keep the rooms in readiness.

Next

SparkNotes: Jane Eyre: Chapters 11

jane eyre chapter 11

The equality between her and me was real; not the mere result of condescension on her part: so much the better--my position was all the freer. By-the-bye, how have you got on with your new pupil this morning? I then proposed to occupy myself till dinner-time in drawing some little sketches for her use. Suddenly, Jane hears a peal of strange, eerie laughter echoing through the house, and Mrs. I wonder if she lives alone except this little girl; if so, and if she is in any degree amiable, I shall surely be able to get on with her; I will do my best; it is a pity that doing one's best does not always answer. As she tours the house with Mrs. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low.

Next

Jane Eyre Chapter 11 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

jane eyre chapter 11

Jane considers it strange enough for a ghost to live in. A snug small room; a round table by a cheerful fire; an arm-chair high-backed and old-fashioned, wherein sat the neatest imaginable little elderly lady, in widow's cap, black silk gown, and snowy muslin apron; exactly like what I had fancied Mrs. Shall I let you hear me sing now? In this room, too, there was a cabinet piano, quite new and of superior tone; also an easel for painting and a pair of globes. Reader, though I look comfortably accommodated, I am not very tranquil in my mind. As I was going upstairs to fetch my portfolio and pencils, Mrs. When Adèle mentions her mother, Jane is intrigued, and Rochester promises to explain more about the situation on a future occasion. A great many gentlemen and ladies came to see mama, and I used to dance before them, or to sit on their knees and sing to them: I liked it.

Next

SparkNotes: Jane Eyre: Chapters 11

jane eyre chapter 11

Fairfax is not, as Jane had assumed from their correspondence, the owner of Thornfield, but rather the housekeeper. My faculties, roused by the change of scene, the new field offered to hope, seemed all astir. Rochester lay down on a sofa in a pretty room called the salon, and Sophie and I had little beds in another place. She observes that he has a dark face, stern features, and a heavy brow. She was occupied in knitting; a large cat sat demurely at her feet; nothing in short was wanting to complete the beau-ideal of domestic comfort.

Next